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As an employer, you do your best to go through the hiring process and carefully choose the right candidate for the position; it’s not something to take lightly. Yet, a 2005 study discovered that 46 percent of newly hired employees fail within 18 months of starting the job – and the results still bear out today. Knowing the reasons ahead of time can help your new employees avoid them in the future.

  1. They’re not the right cultural fit. There is something to be said for factoring in whether a person will fit in with the culture of your company. In fact, in a May 2013 study by Booz & Company, 84 percent of employer respondents surveyed believe corporate culture is critical to success. An employee who fully understands his employer’s unique culture in terms of values, politics, and goals will also come on board more readily. No matter how skilled a candidate may seem, if his work style doesn’t flow with your company’s, the relationship will not work successfully. So be sure to take that into consideration when hiring in the first place.
  2. They lack motivation. Within the interview, find out why this person wants to work for your company. If she can’t give you a straight or satisfactory answer that tells you she’s truly committed to your bottom line and your goals, think twice about hiring her. Those employees who take a job for the paycheck or out of necessity often don’t have the motivation to achieve or improve. And once hired, it’s difficult to create such a motivation if none existed in the first place.
  3. They can’t accept or implement feedback. An employee who lacks the ability to look at constructive criticism as a way to change for the better won’t last long. Whether it’s that he refuses to change, thinking his way is best, or that he simply doesn’t make the suggestions bosses, customers, or colleagues give him, he is not the type of employee who will likely succeed in his position. This also tells you he’s not the best team player, an essential skill for any employee. In an interview, test whether an interviewee responds well to direct feedback. Voice any concern you have about a gap in their experience or their ability to deal with a particular situation, and pay careful attention to the response. This may be a good indicator of how they will handle feedback as an employee.
  4. They don’t have the skills needed. This may mean she comes on the job not having the skills required to truly do it – and that may be on your head, not the employee’s. Make sure you have a clear job description that matches with the candidate’s background and skill level; she shouldn’t start a job and suddenly be expected to do something she has no training in. And to that end, if the position requires training, make sure you give the employee sufficient time and instruction to learn what you need them to. Check in regularly, supervise the person well, and have a clear manual that she can use as a guide.

Some of these failures fall on the employee, but if you look carefully, you can see that you as an employer can avoid them through careful hiring processes and onboarding practices. Talk to the experienced recruiting staff at PrideStaff to help your employees succeed.

3 Responses to “Four Reasons New Employees Fail”

  1. Sundrea Turner

    I totally agree I have been looking for employment for almost a year. I have tons of management experience I have experience in recruiting , processing background checks, pre employment training and testing. My experience also includes reviewing and processing new hire paperwork packets. I am verse in explaining benefits packages
    and dealing with employee issues including coaching, counseling, and termination when appropriate. Now with all my experience I constantly being told that my qualifications do not fit HR jobs or staffing jobs or management positions. I am very confident in my abilities to be successful in any of these fields. I just want an opportunity to do what love and and pay off my student loans.

    Reply
  2. Sundrea Turner

    I totally agree I have been looking for employment for almost a year. I have tons of management experience I have experience in recruiting , processing background checks, pre employment training and testing. My experience also includes reviewing and processing new hire paperwork packets. I am verse in explaining benefits packages
    and dealing with employee issues including coaching, counseling, and termination when appropriate. Now with all my experience I constantly being told that my qualifications do not fit HR jobs or staffing jobs or management positions. I am very confident in my abilities to be successful in any of these fields. I just want an opportunity to do what love and and pay off my student loans.

    Reply
  3. Sundrea Turner

    I totally agree I have been looking for employment for almost a year. I have tons of management experience I have experience in recruiting , processing background checks, pre employment training and testing. My experience also includes reviewing and processing new hire paperwork packets. I am verse in explaining benefits packages
    and dealing with employee issues including coaching, counseling, and termination when appropriate. Now with all my experience I constantly being told that my qualifications do not fit HR jobs or staffing jobs or management positions. I am very confident in my abilities to be successful in any of these fields. I just want an opportunity to do what love and and pay off my student loans.

    Reply

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